Art For Art’s Sake

So what does your run of the mill Art Deco enthusiast hang on the walls of their humble abode? Vintage travel posters? A Chinese reproduction canvas of a Tamara de Lempicka painting?.. or perhaps a framed and mounted period advertisement featuring a stylized sketch of a dashing couple enjoying a glass of a trendy French liqueur! All have their place, and yes, like many others we too have examples of all of these gracing our home. Sometimes however, none of these options seem to fit the bill. Sometimes you find yourself with a very big blank wall requiring eye candy and no budget to commission a suitable piece. Its on these very dangerous, and thankfully very rare occasions I go rummaging and dig out my beret, easel and £1.99 set of acrylic paints!

The project has been a long time coming. I spotted an image online a couple of years ago while googling The Grosvener School of Modern Art. We’ve got some prints by Cyril Power and i was keen to see more of his work when I stumbled on a random image of some birds in flight. It was by Edward (“Ted”) McKnight Kauffer, “one of Europe’s most prolific and influential advertising poster artists during the twenties and thirties”.MD_KaufferEM_Flight_640

The image hit me in the face with a double whammy of admiration and inspiration. Not only was it strikingly original, extremely clever and utterly beautiful, but it looked to my naive eyes that it could easily be copied by an amateur such as myself. I saved the image, logged it on my mental rainy day ‘to do list’ and got on with life.

Cue the completion of our new kitchen. If you look back through some of my previous blogs you’ll see the  lengthy transformation of a huge derelict room into our dream modernist food prep and eating area. An area that came complete with one big blank wall! I could stand it no longer, a trip to The Works stationary emporium was made, and coins exchanged for the biggest budget canvas that they had kicking around.

Phase one included a long length of wood, a pencil and a jpg. I sketched it by eye, not worrying too much about accuracy. With one eye on the Eurovision song contest (A dreadful guilty pleasure the wife and I always watch!) and one on the canvas I was off. Phase 2 included several rolls of masking tape, hole re-enforcers and some sponge brushes borrowed from my 3 year old. Frankly I underestimated the complicated nature of the intersecting lines and it grew ever more mind numbing trying to work out which bit should be which colour. If it wasn’t for the fear of them showing through I would have turned it into a giant paint-by-numbers!

Each stage required the removal of some tape and application of further strips in different areas. The reveal was always a rewarding and exciting moment. Much like on the silver screen with the tense removal of bandages from a beauty queens face after major surgery. Will she look as foxy as she once did? Will the black have leaked under the 50p masking tape ruining the perfectly straight lines? Yes & yes.. she’s still a honey, but nooooo, I knew I should have invested in proper frog tape!

Nevertheless, after a month or so my opus was complete. Some light touching up was required to  improve bleed, but from a distance its not at all bad. I’ll construct a frame of some kind when I get a chance, but for now the naked canvas hangs in the kitchen, adding some drama to the rather plain walls. And here she is…

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About Art Deco Magpie

Seasoned Art Deco collector and blogger Philip Butler, aka Art Deco Magpie, has spent many years transforming the interior of his family home into a 1930’s time warp. Furniture, wall coverings, fixtures, fittings and carpets, nothing has been neglected from his quest to obtain near film set perfection. Combining a love of photography and passion for 20th century history, Philip is now working on his debut book; “Streamline Worcestershire – A Journey Through the Inter-War Modernist Architecture in the County“. Philip lives in Great Malvern with his wife and two young daughters. When not immersing himself in all things Art Deco, he can be found tinkering with classic cars, working in the alcoholic drinks trade, practicing writing in the third person, and trying to be a good dad!
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